Indicator Library

Master List

Purpose

With consistent indicators we have a shared understanding and a foundation for better management of sustainability.

  • Easily interpret impact and performance
  • Capture observed facts and reported perceptions
  • Better insights from a rich multi-dimensional understanding
  • Field-tested globally to permit confident observations and interpretation
Definition: COSA indicators are designed to quantify and clarify information in a manner that promotes the understanding of key environmental, social, and economic issues.

Distinction

What an indicator captures is important but even more valuable is the combined COSA experience to gather, analyze, and communicate results in a balanced and effective manner. COSA indicators are designed to be similar across all countries to allow for comparison but are also adapted to allow for local contexts.

See more indicators for specific sectors such as Tea, etc.
A Sample Of Global themes
S
  • Trading Relationships
  • Community
  • Living and Working Conditions
  • Basic Human Rights and Equity
E
  • Water
  • Soil
  • Resource Management
  • Biodiversity
  • Climate Change
E
  • Producer Livelihood
  • Risk (Economic Resilience)
  • Producer Organization
  • Competitiveness

KEY CHARACTERSTICS

There are a number of vital characteristics, ranging from household characteristics and land tenure to distance to market and shocks, that are critical to understand as part of any sustainability assessment.

  • THEMES
  • CORE ELEMENTS
  • NAME
  • DESCRIPTION
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ENVIRONMENTAL

We incorporate a range of environmental metrics including those in the categories of inputs and resource management, water and soil quality, waste management, good agrochemical practices, greenhouse gas sequestration and mitigation, and biodiversity. Our mapping functions help to contextualize the farm area at the scale of a regional landscape.

  • THEMES
  • CORE ELEMENTS
  • NAME
  • DESCRIPTION
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ECONOMIC

Economic indicators are typically the most visible and the most popular. Ours go beyond traditional measures of income, credit, and assets to include factors of risk, competitiveness, and organizational capacity. The general groups of economic indicators must not be interpreted in a vacuum but rather in balance with social and environmental factors that affect, and are affected by, economic conditions.

  • THEMES
  • CORE ELEMENTS
  • NAME
  • DESCRIPTION
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